University of Minnesota
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Sanjai Rayadurgam

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Staff Member
Phone Number: 
612-625-0331
Office Location: 
6-202 Keller Hall
Biography: 

Sanjai Rayadurgam is a Research Project Specialist at the University of Minnesota Software Engineering Center. His research interests are in software testing, formal analysis and requirements modeling, with particular focus on safety-critical systems development, where he has significant industrial experience. He earned a B.Sc. in Mathematics from the University of Madras at Chennai, and in Computer Science & Engineering, an M.E. from the Indian Institute of Science at Bangalore and a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota at Twin Cities. He is a member of IEEE and ACM.

Recent Publications

Representation of Confidence in Assurance Case Evidence

When evaluating assurance cases, being able to capture the confidence one has in the individual evidence nodes is crucial, as these values form the foundation for determining the confidence one has in the assurance case as a whole. Human opinions are subjective, oftentimes with uncertainty---it is difficult to capture an opinion with a single probability value. Thus, we believe that a distribution best captures a human opinion such as confidence.

Design Considerations for Modeling Modes in Cyber–Physical Systems

Safety critical systems such as cruise control in automotive systems and variable rate bolus in medical device infusion pumps introduce complexity and reduce the flexibility of incremental code modifications. This paper proposes a generic pattern to structure the mode logic such that additions, modifications, and removal of behaviors could be done in a quick and localized fashion without losing model integrity.

Hierarchical Multi-Formalism Proofs of Cyber-Physical Systems

To manage design complexity and provide verification tractability, models of complex cyber-physical systems are typically hierarchically organized into multiple abstraction layers. High-level analysis explores interactions of the system with its physical environment, while embedded software is developed separately based on derived requirements. This separation of lowlevel and high-level analysis also gives hope to scalability, because we are able to use tools that are appropriate for each level. When attempting to perform compositional reasoning in such an

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