University of Minnesota
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Sanjai Rayadurgam

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Staff Member
Phone Number: 
612-625-0331
Office Location: 
6-202 Keller Hall
Biography: 

Sanjai Rayadurgam is a Research Project Specialist at the University of Minnesota Software Engineering Center. His research interests are in software testing, formal analysis and requirements modeling, with particular focus on safety-critical systems development, where he has significant industrial experience. He earned a B.Sc. in Mathematics from the University of Madras at Chennai, and in Computer Science & Engineering, an M.E. from the Indian Institute of Science at Bangalore and a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota at Twin Cities. He is a member of IEEE and ACM.

Recent Publications

From Requirements to Code: Model Based Development of A Medical Cyber Physical System?

The advanced use of technology in medical devices has improved the way health care is delivered to patients. Unfortunately, the increased complexity of modern medical devices poses challenges for development, assurance, and regulatory approval. In an eort to improve the safety of advanced medical devices, organizations such as FDA have supported exploration of techniques to aid in the development and regulatory approval of such systems. In an ongoing research project, our aim is to provide effective development techniques and exemplars of system

Steering Model-Based Oracles to Admit Real Program Behaviors

The oracle - an arbiter of correctness of the system under test (SUT) - is a major component of the testing process. Specifying oracles is challenging for real-time embedded systems, where small changes in time or sensor inputs may cause large differences in behavior. Behavioral models of such systems, often built for analysis and simulation, are appealing for reuse as oracles. However, these models typically provide an idealized view of the system.

Practical Aspects of Building a Constrained Random Test Framework for Safety-critical Embedded Systems

In the safety-critical embedded system industry, one of the key challenges is to demonstrate the robustness and dependability of the product prior to market release, which is typically done using various verification and validation (V&V) strategies. Directed verification testing is a common strategy that performs black-box testing at the system level; however, it only samples a small set of specific system behaviors and requires heavily manual effort.

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