University of Minnesota
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Sanjai Rayadurgam

Photo of Sanjai Rayadurgam
Staff Member
Phone Number: 
612-625-0331
Office Location: 
6-202 Keller Hall
Biography: 

Sanjai Rayadurgam is a Research Project Specialist at the University of Minnesota Software Engineering Center. His research interests are in software testing, formal analysis and requirements modeling, with particular focus on safety-critical systems development, where he has significant industrial experience. He earned a B.Sc. in Mathematics from the University of Madras at Chennai, and in Computer Science & Engineering, an M.E. from the Indian Institute of Science at Bangalore and a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota at Twin Cities. He is a member of IEEE and ACM.

Recent Publications

Structuring Simulink Models for Verification and Reuse

Model-based development (MBD) tool suites such as Simulink and Stateflow offer powerful tools for design, development, and analysis of models. These models can be used for several purposes: for code generation, for prototyping, as descriptions of an environment (plant) that will be controlled by software, as oracles for a testing process, and many other aspects of software development. In addition, a goal of model-based development is to develop reusable models that can be easily managed in a version-controlled continuous integration process.

Exploring the Twin Peaks using Probabilistic Verification Techniques

System requirements and system architecture/design co-evolve as the understanding of both the problem at hand as well as the solution to be deployed evolve---the Twin Peaks concept. Modeling of requirements and solution is a promising approach for exploring the Twin Peaks. Commonly, such models are deterministic because of the choice of modeling notation and available analysis tools. Unfortunately, most systems operate in an uncertain environment and contain physical components whose behaviors are stochastic.

Compositional Verification of a Medical Device System

Complex systems are by necessity hierarchically organized; they are decomposed into subsystems for intellectual control as well as the ability to have the subsystems created by several distinct teams. This decomposition affects both requirements and architecture; the architecture describes the structure and this affects how requirements are ``flowed down'' to each subsystem, and discoveries in the design process may affect the requirements. Demonstrating that a complex system satisfies its requirements when the subsystems are composed is a challenging problem.

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