University of Minnesota
Software Engineering Center
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Critical Systems Research Group

The Critical Systems Research Group’s (CriSys) research interests are in the general area of software engineering; in particular, software development for critical software applications — applications where incorrect operation of the software could lead to loss of life, substantial material or environmental damage, or large monetary losses. The long-term goal of our research activities is the development of a comprehensive framework for the development of software for critical software systems. Our work has focused on some of the most difficult and least understood aspects of software development—requirements specification and validation/verification.

Recent Publications

Toward Rigorous Object-Code Coverage Criteria

Object-branch coverage (OBC) is often used as a measure of the thoroughness of tests suites, augmenting or substituting source-code based structural criteria such as branch coverage and modified condition/decision coverage (MC/DC). In addition, with the increasing use of third-party components for which source-code access may be unavailable, robust object-code coverage criteria are essential to assess how well the components are exercised during testing.

Architecture Modeling and Analysis for Safety Engineering

Architecture description languages such as AADL allow systems engineers to specify the structure of system architectures and perform several analyses over them, including schedulability, resource analysis, and information flow. In addition, they permit system-level requirements to be specified and analyzed early in the development process of airborne and ground-based systems. These tools can also be used to perform safety analysis based on the system architecture and initial functional decomposition.

Challenges in Testing Next Generation CPS Systems

Testing cyber-physical systems presents a unique set of testing challenges: heterogeneity, timing, and, especially, observability. In particular, some of the mechanisms that are designed to make embedded software robust are the same mechanisms that present challenges for automated testing techniques: e.g., rate limiting, fault masking, and debounce logic, which can lead to long lags between problematic inputs and their manifestation in system outputs. In addition, much of the control behavior of CPS is mathematically intensive more than "branchy".

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