University of Minnesota
Software Engineering Center
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Critical Systems Research Group

The Critical Systems Research Group’s (CriSys) research interests are in the general area of software engineering; in particular, software development for critical software applications — applications where incorrect operation of the software could lead to loss of life, substantial material or environmental damage, or large monetary losses. The long-term goal of our research activities is the development of a comprehensive framework for the development of software for critical software systems. Our work has focused on some of the most difficult and least understood aspects of software development—requirements specification and validation/verification.

Recent Publications

Discovering Instructions for Robust Binary-level Coverage Criteria

Object-Branch Coverage (OBC) is often used to measure e ective- ness of test suites, when source code is unavailable. The traditional OBC de nition can be made more resilient to variations in compil- ers and the structure of generated code by creating more robust de nitions. However nding which instructions should be included in each new de nition is laborious, error-prone, and architecture- dependent. We automate the discovery of instructions to be in- cluded for an improved OBC de nition on the X86 and ARM archi- tectures.

Domain Modeling for Development Process Simulation

Simulating agile processes prior to adoption can reduce the risk of enacting an ill-fitting process. Agent-based simulation is well-suited to capture the individual decision-making valued in agile. Yet, agile's lightweight nature creates simulation difficulties as agents must fill-in gaps within the specified process. Deliberative agents can do this given a suitable planning domain model. However, no such model, nor guidance for creating one, currently exists.

Requirements and Architectures for Secure Vehicles

In the High-Assurance Cyber Military Systems project, researchers are investigating how to construct complex networked-vehicle software securely. Experiments demonstrated that careful attention to requirements and system architecture, along with formally verified approaches that remove known security weaknesses, can lead to vehicles that can withstand attacks from even sophisticated attackers with access to vehicle design data.

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