University of Minnesota
Software Engineering Center
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Sanjai Rayadurgam

Photo of Sanjai Rayadurgam
Director of the Software Engineering Center
Phone Number: 
612-625-0331
Office Location: 
6-202 Keller Hall
Education: 
B.Sc. in Mathematics, University of Madras, Chennai (1989)
M.E. in Computer Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (1993)
Ph.D. in Computer and Information Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (2004)
Biography: 

Sanjai Rayadurgam is the director of the University of Minnesota Software Engineering Center and is a Research Project Specialist in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering. His research interests are in software testing, formal analysis and requirements modeling, with particular focus on safety-critical systems development. Prior to his work at the University of Minnesota, he worked at Boston Scientific, performing advanced tools development, systems engineering, and verification and validation of implantable cardiac device. He For his doctoral dissertation he developed techniques to automatically derive tests from behavioral models of software that could meet stringent coverage criteria. He has co-authored several research papers and articles in software engineering. He was a co-organizer of Dagstuhl seminar on Software and Systems Traceability for Safety-Critical Projects in 2015, was a program co-chair for the NASA Formal Methods Symposium in 2016 and is in the program committees of various workshops and conferences in software engineering.

Research: 
His recent research areas include contract-discovery and coverage techniques for black-box object-code components funded by a NSF grant, test generation and verification of plan executions for autonomy platforms funded by a NASA grant, testing techniques of learning enabled components for assuring autonomous systems funded under a DARPA project and model based fuzz testing funded under an ONR project.
Interests: 
Software Engineering, Formal Methods, Automated Testing, High Assurance Autonomy

Recent Publications

Efficient Observability-based Test Generation by Dynamic Symbolic Execution

Structural coverage metrics have been widely used to measure test suite adequacy as well as to generate test cases. In previous investigations, we have found that the fault-finding effectiveness of tests satisfying structural coverage criteria is highly dependent on program syntax – even if the faulty code is exercised, its effect may not be observable at the output. To address these problems, observability-based coverage metrics have been defined.

Representation of Confidence in Assurance Case Evidence

When evaluating assurance cases, being able to capture the confidence one has in the individual evidence nodes is crucial, as these values form the foundation for determining the confidence one has in the assurance case as a whole. Human opinions are subjective, oftentimes with uncertainty---it is difficult to capture an opinion with a single probability value. Thus, we believe that a distribution best captures a human opinion such as confidence.

Design Considerations for Modeling Modes in Cyber–Physical Systems

Safety critical systems such as cruise control in automotive systems and variable rate bolus in medical device infusion pumps introduce complexity and reduce the flexibility of incremental code modifications. This paper proposes a generic pattern to structure the mode logic such that additions, modifications, and removal of behaviors could be done in a quick and localized fashion without losing model integrity.

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