University of Minnesota
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Sanjai Rayadurgam

Photo of Sanjai Rayadurgam
Director of the Software Engineering Center
Phone Number: 
612-625-0331
Office Location: 
6-202 Keller Hall
Education: 
B.Sc. in Mathematics, University of Madras, Chennai (1989)
M.E. in Computer Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (1993)
Ph.D. in Computer and Information Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (2004)
Biography: 

Sanjai Rayadurgam is the director of the University of Minnesota Software Engineering Center and is a Research Project Specialist in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering. His research interests are in software testing, formal analysis and requirements modeling, with particular focus on safety-critical systems development. Prior to his work at the University of Minnesota, he worked at Boston Scientific, performing advanced tools development, systems engineering, and verification and validation of implantable cardiac device. He For his doctoral dissertation he developed techniques to automatically derive tests from behavioral models of software that could meet stringent coverage criteria. He has co-authored several research papers and articles in software engineering. He was a co-organizer of Dagstuhl seminar on Software and Systems Traceability for Safety-Critical Projects in 2015, was a program co-chair for the NASA Formal Methods Symposium in 2016 and is in the program committees of various workshops and conferences in software engineering.

Research: 
His recent research areas include contract-discovery and coverage techniques for black-box object-code components funded by a NSF grant, test generation and verification of plan executions for autonomy platforms funded by a NASA grant, testing techniques of learning enabled components for assuring autonomous systems funded under a DARPA project and model based fuzz testing funded under an ONR project.
Interests: 
Software Engineering, Formal Methods, Automated Testing, High Assurance Autonomy

Recent Publications

Practical Aspects of Building a Constrained Random Test Framework for Safety-critical Embedded Systems

In the safety-critical embedded system industry, one of the key challenges is to demonstrate the robustness and dependability of the product prior to market release, which is typically done using various verification and validation (V&V) strategies. Directed verification testing is a common strategy that performs black-box testing at the system level; however, it only samples a small set of specific system behaviors and requires heavily manual effort.

Structuring Simulink Models for Verification and Reuse

Model-based development (MBD) tool suites such as Simulink and Stateflow offer powerful tools for design, development, and analysis of models. These models can be used for several purposes: for code generation, for prototyping, as descriptions of an environment (plant) that will be controlled by software, as oracles for a testing process, and many other aspects of software development. In addition, a goal of model-based development is to develop reusable models that can be easily managed in a version-controlled continuous integration process.

Exploring the Twin Peaks using Probabilistic Verification Techniques

System requirements and system architecture/design co-evolve as the understanding of both the problem at hand as well as the solution to be deployed evolve---the Twin Peaks concept. Modeling of requirements and solution is a promising approach for exploring the Twin Peaks. Commonly, such models are deterministic because of the choice of modeling notation and available analysis tools. Unfortunately, most systems operate in an uncertain environment and contain physical components whose behaviors are stochastic.

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