University of Minnesota
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Sanjai Rayadurgam

Photo of Sanjai Rayadurgam
Director of the Software Engineering Center
Phone Number: 
612-625-0331
Office Location: 
6-202 Keller Hall
Education: 
B.Sc. in Mathematics, University of Madras, Chennai (1989)
M.E. in Computer Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (1993)
Ph.D. in Computer and Information Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (2004)
Biography: 

Sanjai Rayadurgam is the director of the University of Minnesota Software Engineering Center and is a Research Project Specialist in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering. His research interests are in software testing, formal analysis and requirements modeling, with particular focus on safety-critical systems development. Prior to his work at the University of Minnesota, he worked at Boston Scientific, performing advanced tools development, systems engineering, and verification and validation of implantable cardiac device. He For his doctoral dissertation he developed techniques to automatically derive tests from behavioral models of software that could meet stringent coverage criteria. He has co-authored several research papers and articles in software engineering. He was a co-organizer of Dagstuhl seminar on Software and Systems Traceability for Safety-Critical Projects in 2015, was a program co-chair for the NASA Formal Methods Symposium in 2016 and is in the program committees of various workshops and conferences in software engineering.

Research: 
His recent research areas include contract-discovery and coverage techniques for black-box object-code components funded by a NSF grant, test generation and verification of plan executions for autonomy platforms funded by a NASA grant, testing techniques of learning enabled components for assuring autonomous systems funded under a DARPA project and model based fuzz testing funded under an ONR project.
Interests: 
Software Engineering, Formal Methods, Automated Testing, High Assurance Autonomy

Recent Publications

Modeling and Requirements on the Physical Side of Cyber-Physical Systems

In a cyber-physical system (a system where the physical world interacts extensively with—often networked— software), the physical portion of the system resides in the continuous and continual domain. Thus, on the physical side of cyber-physical systems we will have to contend with not only real time requirements but also the continuous and continual nature of the system.

Using Models to Address Challenges in Specifying Requirements for Medical Cyber-Physical Systems

Gathering and analyzing Cyber-Physical System (CPS) requirements pose some challenges to the requirements engineering community warranting a fresh perspective on requirement engineering methods; a perspective that is sensitive to the interplay between the cyber and physical aspects of the system. In this paper we share our experiences and lessons learned in the process of formulating requirements for a generic version of an infusion pump, a commonly used piece of medical equipment.

Your "What" is My "How": Iteration and Hierarchy in System Design

Systems are naturally constructed in hierarchies, in which design choices made at higher levels of abstraction levy requirements on system components at the lower levels. Thus, whether an aspect of a system is a design choice or a requirement largely depends on your vantage point within the system components' hierarchy. Systems are also often constructed from the middle-out rather than top-down; compatibility with existing systems and architectures and availability of specific components influence high-level requirements.

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