University of Minnesota
Software Engineering Center
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Minnesota Extensible Language Tools

Software development is a time-consuming and error-prone process that often results in unreliable and insecure software. At least part of the reason for these undesirable results is that large semantic gap between the programmer's high-level understanding of the problem and the relatively low-level programming language in which the problem solutions are encoded. Thus, programmers cannot "say what they mean" but must encode their ideas as programming idioms at a lower level of abstraction. This wastes time and is the source of many errors. A long range goal is to improve the software development process and the quality of the resulting software artifacts by reducing the semantic gap. Extensible languages provide a promising way to achieve this goal. An extensible language can easily be extended with the unique combination of domain-specific language features that raises the level of abstraction to that of the task at hand. The extended language provides the programmer with language constructs, optimizations, and static program analyses to significantly simplify the software development process.

Recent Publications

Verifiable Parse Table Composition for Deterministic Parsing

One obstacle to the implementation of modular extensions to programming languages lies in the problem of parsing extended languages. Specifically, the parse tables at the heart of traditional LALR(1) parsers are so monolithic and tightly constructed that, in the general case, it is impossible to extend them without regenerating them from the source grammar. Current extensible frameworks employ a variety of solutions, ranging from a full regeneration to using pluggable binary modules for each different extension.

Flexibility in Modeling Languages and Tools: A Call to Arms

In model-based development, the software development effort is centered around a formal description of the proposed software system; a description that can be subjected to various types of analysis and code generation. Based on years of experience with model-based development and formal modeling we believe that the following conjectures describe fundamental obstacles to wide adoption of formal modeling and the potential for automation that comes with it; (1) no single modeling notation will suit all, or even most, modeling needs,

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